Before entering a photo competition, read the T&C (I hate this)

UPDATE – My friend Greg pointed this out to me:


He “teasingly” added the “#5secondswithgoogle” hashtag but my point was the OP should have included this info in her her post.

While this is good advice, I REALLY hate when web sites do this.

Photocritic talks about “competition rights grabs” by some photography competitions. It’s a good read and definitely something you should think about if you enter these kinds of competitions.

The author says:

This reminder comes as I received a call for entries to a competition run in conjunction with an organisation that I respect and trust, and hoped would be above cheap tactics to help magazines or other companies amass a photo library for free.

Yikes. Sounds serious. What organization is it? The author quotes from the competition’s terms and conditions:

By entering your photos in the competition you agree to grant REDACTED and REDACTED a non-exclusive licence to reproduce, publish and feature the photos in association with this competition, or for any other purpose, at any time, in any publication, website or other associated media outlets, without compensation. By entering you agree to grant REDACTED and REDACTED an exclusive royalty-free licence to use the full set of images taken on your photography trip [which comprises the prize] for 12 months.

See the problem?

WHO THE HELL IS SHE TALKING ABOUT?

You can’t call an organization out and not name names. First of all, I want to check your facts. I can’t if I don’t know who you are talking about. Secondly, it’s cowardly to warn photographers about “BAD THINGS!” without telling them where those bad things are lurking.

She says:

you are doing yourself and fellow photographers—amateur and professional—a disservice in the long run.

I would argue, so are you.

3 thoughts on “Before entering a photo competition, read the T&C (I hate this)

  1. Hi there. I’m sorry that you don’t like the fact that I won’t ‘call out’ the competition with which I disagree, but it’s deliberate so as not to draw more attention to it. It’s certainly not cowardly: it’s a considered action.

    • “it’s deliberate so as not to draw more attention to it.”

      Considering the fact you WROTE A BLOG POST ABOUT IT, that’s quite possibly the most ridiculous thing you could possibly have said.

      And your “considered action” simply causes unnecessary confusion and effort on the part of your readership.

      I’ll stand by “cowardly”.

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